You – 1, bad recruiting practises – 0: using candidate scorecards

Orla Hodnett
Orla Hodnett

The arguments in favour of using scorecards in your recruiting process are many. To put it in perspective, I do not have enough fingers and toes to count them. They simplify your process, while helping you make decisions based on accurate information. No gut instinct or unintentional bias, just the best information available to you will help you make your choices.

It is all well and good, talking about how great scorecards might be to your for your recruiting process, but how do you get the best out of them? Here are a few best- practises suggestions to help you include scorecards into your next hiring campaign.

Records

For compliance with various regulatory and workers’ rights organisations, record keeping is essential. Particularly important is data on your candidates, your recruiting process and why candidates were picked for a role. HireHive offers the option of using scorecards during the interview process, which can then be stored in the candidate’s profile, giving you a neat set of records on your candidate.

By using a scorecard on the basis of merit, experience and interview performance, you leave yourself with a very useful record of your recruiting efforts, which can be easily referred to in the case of EEOC investigation or similar requests.

Create effective scorecards with your team

Once you know what your want and need from your candidates, that is half the job done. The next step is working out the information you need from your individual candidates, as well as how you are going to get the information from them.  

HireHive allows you to create custom scorecards with your hiring team, allowing you to evaluate the candidate and their skills, relative to your needs.

While a very useful tool in the recruiting process, a scorecard cannot be used as a crutch in the interview process

Don’t focus on the card too much in the interview

While a very useful tool in the recruiting process, a scorecard cannot be used as a crutch in the interview process. An interview might be the only opportunity to meet with a candidate face-to-face, so you have to take full advantage of this time with them.

Work out a system of shorthand or use numbers as much as possible when taking notes through the duration of the interview. Ensure to maintain eye contact and engage with your interviewee as much as possible.

Work out the requirements needed from any new hires

Knowing exactly what you need from a candidate is essential when employing this technique in screening and interviewing candidates. If you have not figured this much out no scorecard or strategy will help you!

Work out a list of must-have skills that your candidates must have, as well as standardised questions for each candidate on those skills. A list of additional or optional skills should also be included, should they be a deciding factor at the end of the process. With this information gathered, you can be certain that any decision you make will be based on the best, most accurate knowledge you have.

The simplest way of reassuring candidates and ensuring they learn from the experience is good communication, coupled with feedback

Improved candidate experience

Making sure your candidates walk away from your recruiting process with a positive view of your organisation is essential. The simplest way of reassuring candidates and ensuring they learn from the experience is good communication, coupled with feedback.

Using a candidate scorecard through the screening and phone interview stage of your process will give you a clear, straightforward resource for you to provide feedback to your interviewees.

 

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